Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Richmond: TDC Entrance

At the entrance of Tasman District Council Building in Richmond, there is a beautiful Maori Carving. The curver's name is Jon Mutu according to the plate beside the work. Sorry, I have not much information about this person.

Here is the closeup of plate.

8 comments:

  1. Since my recent trip to Victoria, BC, Canada, I've been reading up on First Nation's carving traditions. I was stunned to find some research supporting a direct connection between the Maori, Polonisian/Hawaiian, and Vancouver Island carving traditions. Small world along the wide Pacific Rim!
    I love the colors and lines in your shot!
    -Kim

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  2. looks great! the tree and the structure combination balance both...

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  3. Very nice! As I was noting on the other New Zealand DP, I fell in love with New Zealand after seeing the first "Lord of the Rings." Such natural beauty! Do you ever go rafting or hiking around any of the beautiful spots in the movie? I would love to do that! I think that movie probably did a lot of great advertising for your country!

    I also loved that movie Whale Rider which was in New Zealand (one of my all time favorites)! I wonder about the tribe that created the carving you show. I wonder if they are similar to the ones depicted in the movie (I understand that a lot were extras). Fascinating!

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  4. For those interested in New Zealand, see Whale Rider, one of the most poignant movies of all times. A definitely moving women's movie but men should like it too.

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  5. Rich, strong carving. Nice shot honoring an interesting culture.

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  6. I like the rich colors of the carving. The information on the plate was very interesting, too. And I enjoyed Whale Rider as well. Did it make anybody else out there tear/choke up?

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  7. Cristina, yes, the entire movie theatre, except me. I'm such a hardened soul, it seems.

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  8. Thank you everyone.
    Indeed, Maori culture is fascinating one and all those connections to others. I even find very smiler customs we (Japanese) have in some occasion.
    The curving is often (always?) telling a story of their ancestors or their customs.

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